One In Three Business Jobs Funded By State

18 Aug 2017 | 02.16 pm

One In Three Business Jobs Funded By State

State agencies assist companies employing 409,000 people

18 Aug 2017 | 02.16 pm

Companies supported by Enterprise Ireland, IDA and Údarás na Gaeltachta reported full and part-time employment of over 409,040 jobs in 2016, accounting for 31% of total business employment in Ireland. There was a 5.4% increase in total employment in agency client companies since 2015, an increase of over 21,000 jobs.

The 2016 Annual Employment Survey, carried out by the Department of Jobs, Enterprise and Innovation, provides an analysis of employment levels in Industrial (including primary production) and Services companies assisted by the taxpayer-funded development agencies.

Total full-time employment among Irish-owned companies amounted to 176,270 in 2016, an increase of 6.3% over 2015. This increase continues the five year trend of positive employment growth for Irish-owned firms, following four years of net losses in employment between 2008 and 2011.

Employment in Irish-owned firms increased by 27% from the low point in 2011 (138,460) to 2016 (176,270). Irish-owned companies accounted for 49% of total full-time employment in agency-assisted firms in 2016.

Among foreign-owned companies, total full-time employment amounted to 185,780 in 2016, an increase of 10,120 jobs (5.8%) over the previous year and the sixth successive year of growth. Employment in foreign-owned firms stood at 158,200 in 2007.

Gross job gains for 2016 are 33,700 which is down on the 2015 figure of 38,160, though the department said gross job losses of 13,060 were are at their lowest level for more than a decade. Part-time and temporary employment in agency-assisted firms increased by 430 jobs in 2016 to reach 47,000. Employment in Irish-owned firms assisted by taxpayer funding has increased by 6.3% between 2007 and 2016.

Regional Employment

The South and East (S&E) region remains the largest region in terms of employment, accounting for 149,090 jobs, or 41%, of total agency-assisted employment, followed by the Dublin region with 133,480 full-time jobs (37%) and the Border, Midlands and West region with 79,475 employed (22%).

Sectoral Employment

The sectoral employment breakdown shows evidence of continuing structural change in agency-assisted companies towards Services sectors. Full-time employment in all Industrial sector companies increased to 205,850 in 2016, up from 196,490 in 2015, a rise of 4.8%. Services employment increased more significantly to 156,200, up from 144,920 in 2015, a rise of 7.8%.

A total of 62,130 full-time jobs were recorded in the Irish-owned Services sector in 2016, with a net gain of 5,000 jobs (8.8%) over 2015. The sub-sectors with the highest net employment gains in 2013 were: Computer Consultancy Activities (1,196 jobs) and Other Information and Communication Services (528 jobs). Proportionately, the sub-sectors that gained most employment were: Computer Facilities Management (133.3%) and Computer Programming Activities (40.2%).

In the foreign-owned Industrial sector, total full-time jobs amounted to 91,710 in 2016, up 4.4%. The sub-sectors with the most significant net jobs gains in 2016 were: Medical and Dental Instruments and Supplies (2,154 jobs), Chemicals (1,525 jobs) and Computer, Electronic and Optical Equipment (257 jobs). In proportionate terms the significant sub-sectors that fared best in 2016 over 2015 in terms of employment net change were the same as above – Medical and Dental Instruments and Supplies (9.7%) and Chemicals (7.1%).

A total of 94,060 full-time jobs were recorded in the foreign-owned Services sector in 2016, with a net gain of 7.1% over 2015. The sub-sectors with the highest net employment gains were: Computer Programming Activities (1,366 jobs) and Other Information Technology and Computer Services Activities (1,173 jobs). Proportionately, the sub-sectors that gained most employment were: Other Information and Communication Services (34.4%) and Business Services (23.2%).

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