Accenture Highlights Education Shortcomings

25 Feb 2020 | 11.06 am

Accenture Highlights Education Shortcomings

Learning to Lead report

25 Feb 2020 | 11.06 am

A new report from Accenture has found that education and businesses are at odds over how prepared students are for the working world.

Accenture’s Learning to Lead report found that while almost two-thirds of teachers think students are equipped for the workplace, four out of ten employers disagree.

Moreover, only one in four employers think the education sector is keeping pace with business needs. The report adds that the speed and direction of travel in education is an issue for around half of companies.

The report canvassed the views of c.600 teachers, parents, young adults and employers.

Alastair Blair (pictured), country managing director at Accenture in Ireland, commented: “If we want Ireland to continue to provide a talent pool for the innovative companies based here, as well as improve the prospects of home-grown businesses, we must think hard about what they will need.

“We have a good education system in Ireland but, according to our report, there are challenges at second level – where the focus is more on aptitude than attitude.

“This is more than just a research announcement – it’s a call to action for a stronger approach to how government, business and education can work together to shape a society in Ireland fit for the opportunities of tomorrow.”

When asked what skills would be most needed for the workforce of the future, employers identified transversal soft skills, such as communication, strong work ethic, teamwork, and an ability to problem solve.

OTHER LEARNING TO LEAD FINDINGS

+ Half of 16-25-year olds don’t think the way subjects are taught in secondary school has equipped them adequately.

+ 47 percent of teachers and 61 percent of 16-25 year olds don’t believe students are being taught the right skills in secondary school.

+ Though six in ten employer believe the education sector is lagging behind industry needs, less than half are looking to make up the shortfall with more internal training.

 

 

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